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Strategic Feeding For Sports Horses

Does when we feed as well as what we feed affect the performance of our sports horses? There is little evidence as yet, but there are some strategies that could help maximise performance and maximum recovery after exercise. Feeding for healthy sports horses Before we investigate strategies for timing and specific nutrients to try and affect performance, it is worth … Continue reading

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Make Dietary Changes With Care

Make all dietary changes gradually to ensure the horse’s digestive tract adapts to the new diet. This applies to both hard feed and forage, including grass, hay and haylage.  Many horse owners are aware of making changes to their horse’s hard feed gradually, but some don’t realise this rule of feeding also applies to forages and indeed any change to … Continue reading

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Feeding For Weight Gain

When less grass is available, some horses struggle to maintain weight, which means they need their energy intake from forage and supplementary feed increased. Forage assessment is the first step, followed by adding concentrate feed and, if required, vegetable oil or oil-rich supplements. Weight gain or an increase in condition requires an increase in dietary energy (calorie) intake, over and … Continue reading

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Feeding the veteran in winter

Winter can be challenging for veteran horses, especially once their dental function starts to decline. Adjusting the diet to ensure enough chewable fibre intake and enough energy for condition can take some juggling. In addition, over winter when grass is sparse, essential micronutrients should be elevated and a good intake of antioxidants ensured. Our horses are living for longer nowadays, … Continue reading

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Make dietary changes with care

Make all dietary changes gradually to ensure the horse’s digestive tract adapts to the new diet. This applies to both hard feed and forage, including grass, hay and haylage. Many horse owners are aware of making changes to their horse’s hard feed gradually, but some don’t realise this rule of feeding also applies to forages and indeed any change to … Continue reading

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Get More Out of Schooling with these 5 Tips…

Whatever level you ride at, whether you’re a dressage rider or show jumping rider, or you simply enjoy schooling your horse to improve his suppleness, remember these 5 tips to get the most out of every session: Ride your corners correctly. Whatever movement you’d like to do after the corner, whether a transition, a shoulder in, a halt or simply … Continue reading

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Short on Facilities? Filler Ideas

If you’re not lucky enough to have access to a full set of jumps in a lovely arena – fear not! Here’s 13 ideas you might be able to make use of… Find any of the following, then paint them, fill them and stack them to create interesting fillers which will prepare your horse for anything spooky in the ring: … Continue reading

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Does Your Horse Yawn?

We understand yawning to be a sign of tiredness or boredom, but it’s not always the case. A horse that yawns, or curls his top lip regularly (The Flehmen response), could actually be affected by gastric disturbances. This is a common behaviour for horses that smell a unknown, or particularly strong smell, but it needs investigation if a horse displays the … Continue reading

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Training Tips: Position or Posture?

POSITION OR POSTURE? It’s very important to differentiate between position and posture and ensure both are correct. You can’t have a good seat and balance unless your position is correct in the first place. The very first thing we are taught when we sit on a horse is to have a good position, which generally is a fast process; then … Continue reading

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Training Tips: How to Create Impulsion and Why it’s Important

From the early stages of learning how to ride, we hear the word ‘impulsion’. What exactly is impulsion and how do we achieve it? Impulsion has nothing to do with speed, and we should think more about ‘energy’ and ‘bounce’ instead. A horse with good impulsion will be in front of the leg, willing to move forward and reactive to … Continue reading

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